The Nicene Creed

Nicene Creed

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Icon depicting the Emperor Constantine, accompanied by the bishopsof the First Council of Nicaea (325), holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.

The Nicene Creed (Greek: Σύμβολον τῆς Νίκαιας, Latin:Symbolum Nicaenum) is the profession of faith or creed that is most widely used in Christian liturgy. It forms the mainstream definition of Christianity for most Christians.[1]

It is called Nicene /ˈnsn/ because, in its original form, it was adopted in the city of Nicaea (present day Iznik in Turkey) by the first ecumenical council, which met there in the year 325.[2]

The Nicene Creed has been normative for the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Church of the East, the Oriental Orthodox churches, the Anglican Communion, and the great majority of Protestant denominations. It forms the mainstream definition of Christianity itself in Nicene Christianity.[1]

The Apostles’ Creed, which in its present form is later, is also broadly accepted in the West, but is not used in the Easternliturgy.[3] One or other of these two creeds is recited in theRoman Rite Mass directly after the homily on all Sundays andsolemnities (Tridentine feasts of the first class). In the Roman Catholic Church, the Nicene Creed is part of the profession of faith[4] required of those undertaking important functions within the Church.[5]

In the Byzantine Rite the Nicene Creed is always sung or recited at the Divine Liturgy[6] immediately preceding the Anaphora (Eucharistic Prayer) and is also recited daily at compline,[7] as well as at sundry other services.

We believe in one God,
the Father, the Almighty,
maker of heaven and earth,
of all that is, seen and unseen.

We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ,
the only Son of God,
eternally begotten of the Father,
God from God, Light from Light,
true God from true God,
begotten, not made,
of one Being with the Father.

Through him all things were made.
For us and for our salvation
he came down from heaven:
by the power of the Holy Spirit
he became incarnate from the Virgin Mary,
and was made man.

For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate;
he suffered death and was buried.
On the third day he rose again
in accordance with the Scriptures;
he ascended into heaven
and is seated at the right hand of the Father.
He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead, and his kingdom will have no end.

We believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life,
who proceeds from the Father and the Son.
With the Father and the Son he is worshiped and glorified.

He has spoken through the Prophets.
We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic Church.
We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins.
We look for the resurrection of the dead,
and the life of the world to come. Amen.

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